Ayahuasca Visions | El Encanto de las Piedras by Pablo Amaringo


El Encanto de las Piedras by Pablo Amaringo

Encanto de las Piedras by Pablo amaringo

In ancient times shamans and fortune tellers wore necklaces of precious stones, and the kings and priests of ancient Persia and Babylonia believed in their divinity.  The magnificent bejewelled sachamama (Mother of the forest) represents the mineral origin of life on Earth. At the top left a sumiruna holds a lustrous encanto (magical stone) which radiates incandescent light for healing deadly diseases.  To the right is a lobo marino (sea lion), a yangunturo (giant armadillo), a bufeo colorado (pink dolphin), a Scarlet Macaw, and an anguilamama (electric eel). These animals carry stones inside their stomachs for digestion.

This painting  is featured in the book ‘The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo‘  published by Inner Traditions 2011. Authors Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley.

Click to visit the website of the book for articles and interviews with Pablo Amaringo, also photo galleries and see the paintings with summary narratives.

To purchase high quality fine art reproductions and Greeting Cards of the paintings click to visit our store

25% Promotional Discount until December 31st 2012. Promotion Code: JXXUEV

ABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO

Encanto de las Piedras by Pablo amaringoIllustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.

With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

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Ayahuasca Visions | Huarmi Taquina (Icaro de la Mujer) by Pablo Amaringo


Huarmi Taquina | (Icaro de la Mujer) by Pablo Amaringo

Huarmi Taquina by Pablo AmaringoHuarmi taquina is the icaro for drawing in feminine creative energy into an ayahuasca ceremony. It is a very powerful icaro which connects us to Mother Earth, the Pachamama: the principle that brings new life to the world.

The lianas and flowers to the right show how nature delights us with her beauty. The beautiful women and sirenas seen below near the waters represent divine union and beauty. The horse symbolises the burden that people carry in their lives, but despite the suffering we persevere, and give birth to new life and nurture our children.

This painting  is featured in the book ‘The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo‘  published by Inner Traditions 2011. Authors Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley.

Click to visit the website of the book for articles and interviews with Pablo Amaringo, also photo galleries and see the paintings with summary narratives.

To purchase high quality fine art reproductions and Greeting Cards of the paintings click to visit our store

25% Promotional Discount until December 31st 2012. Promotion Code: JXXUEV

ABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO

Huarmi Taquina by Pablo AmaringoIllustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.

With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

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Sumak Ňusta | by Pablo Amaringo


Sumak Nusta by Pablo AmaringoSumak Ňusta  (Hermosa Doncella) by Pablo Amaringo

She is a fairy from the Aquarius constellation and she stands in front of a celestial temple inspiring love, beauty, and gentleness. In her hand she holds a jar of aromatic balsam, and flowing from this are iridescent waves that transmit the sublime fragrance of flowers. She is a specialist in the extraction and distillation of balsams, scents, and incenses from flowering plants found only on earth. Her delightful perfumes are a source of joy and contentment for these extraterrestrial beings.

ABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO

Illustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.

With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

Click on link to Visit the website of the book

 

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Ayahuasca Visions | Pablo Amaringo Feature in Sacred Hoop Magazine


Pablo Amaringo at Usko Ayar, Pucallpa, Peru. April 2007

Pablo Amaringo at Usko Ayar, Pucallpa, Peru. April 2007

Article from Sacred Hoop Magazine Issue 71 (2011) about the book ‘The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo’, by Howard G Charing, Peter Cloudsley.The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo

ABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO

Illustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.

With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

Click on link to Visit the website of the book

 

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Ayahuasca Visions | Soplo del Banco Puma by Pablo Amaringo


Soplo del Banco Puma  by Pablo Amaringo

Soplo del Banco Puma by Pablo AmaringoThe banco puma is a master shaman who transforms himself into a puma to go hunting or to hide from an enemy. In the old days when people in the Ucayali region did not have fire arms to kill large animals, the banco puma would use his ability to bring back food for his family.

When the shaman transforms himself into a puma he acquires its attributes; in particular a keen sense of smell, and sinchi-ňahui (strong eyes) which can mesmerise an enemy. A banco puma is a skilled healer with great knowledge of medicinal plants.

This painting  is featured in the book ‘The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo‘  published by Inner Traditions 2011. Authors Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley.

Click to visit the website of the book for articles and interviews with Pablo Amaringo, also photo galleries and see the paintings with summary narratives.

To purchase high quality fine art reproductions and Greeting Cards of the paintings click to visit our store

25% Promotional Discount until December 31st 2012. Promotion Code: JXXUEV

ABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO

Soplo del Banco Puma by Pablo AmaringoIllustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.

With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

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Mamadou Cissé | Cities of the Imagination


This post explores the work of Mamadou Cissé and follows up from a previous post about the exhibition ‘Histoires de Voir‘ held at the Fondation Cartier earlier this year. Here is an interview with Mamadou with  Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray from the website anotherafrica.net titled Mamadou Cissé | A Griot For Modern Cosmopolis

 

 

Definition of Griot (Wikipedia)

A griot (play /ˈɡri.oʊ/; French pronunciation: ​[ɡʁi.o]) or jeli (djeli or djéli in French spelling) is a West African historian, storyteller, praise singer, poet and/or musician. The griot is a repository of oral tradition. As such, they are sometimes also called bards. According to Paul Oliver in his book Savannah Syncopators, “Though [the griot] has to know many traditional songs without error, he must also have the ability to extemporize on current events, chance incidents and the passing scene. His wit can be devastating and his knowledge of local history formidable”. Although they are popularly known as “praise singers”, griots may also use their vocal expertise for gossip, satire, or political comment.

Mamadou Cisse artGriots today live in many parts of West Africa, and are present among the Mande peoples (Mandinka, Malinké, Bambara, etc.), Fulɓe (Fula), Hausa, Songhai, Tukulóor, Wolof, Serer, Mossi, Dagomba, Mauritanian Arabs and many other smaller groups. The word may derive from the French transliteration “guiriot” of the Portuguese word “criado”, or masculine singular term for “servant”. These story-tellers are more predominant in the northern portions of West Africa.[citation needed]

In African languages, griots are referred to by a number of names: jeli in northern Mande areas, jali in southern Mande areas, guewel in Wolof, gawlo in Pulaar (Fula). Griots form an endogamous caste, meaning that most of them only marry fellow griots and that those who are not griots do not normally perform the same functions that they perform.

 Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray with Mamadou Cissé

Mamadou Cisse ArtAt the antipode of countryside mythology and suburbian utopianism, the imaginary cities of Mamadou Cissé burst forth from their colourful grids across the landscape of the creative spectrum. Pondering the inevitable changes of modern society, Cissé condenses his bewildering perspectives by laying on the canvas the groundwork of his ongoing contemplation of  future cosmopolis. An autodidact in the purist sense of the word, Cissé is a commanding artist whose had to pay the kind of dues that are all but unthinkable to most pupils emanating from art schools today. His art career was by no means a smooth sailing one. Gazing at the apparently chaotic path which ultimately lead him to recognition, one can almost see it as a messianic journey, especially in view of the bounty of critical acclaim the artist is currently receiving the world over.

Part real and imaginary, Mamadou Cissé’s urban grids are always depicted as if viewed from a helicopter hovering above the cities of Paris, New York, Sydney, Chicago or Addis Ababa for that matter.
Revealing the core vitality and density withheld inside each of these phantasmagoric hubs, Cissé’s artwork reflects an innate forte for planning and optimising surfaces; a sort of colourful tongue-Mamadou Cisse Artin-cheek to Jacques Tati’s cinematographic architectural anthem, ’Playtime.’ Cissé’s ethos as a self-invented urbanist, aborts the need to claim more urban space as residential alternatives; instead his ambition is to build upwards in order to avoid spreading out any further onto an increasingly scarce and precious land. The art of  Mamadou Cissé is visionary in the sense that it offers a glimpse at a possible cultural fusion, unearthing futuristic abodes where fulfilling and creative urban lives can thrive. Often romanticised and fantasist, Cissé succeeds in raising concepts that are as thoughtful as they are insightful.

Operating a sort of ideological paradigm shift for the incredible power of human endeavour,  Cissé’s oeuvre probes us to reflect on man’s ability to re-create his environment, hopefully for one that is better, safer and far more harmonious than its precedent avatars. Another Africa recently met with the artist in Paris to talk about his current projects, dreams & aspirations and above all his optimistic vision for a joyful “Urbis et Orbis”.

Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray | You were born in a small village called Baghagha near Zigninchor (in Senegal), what triggered your move to Paris at the tender age of 18?

Mamadou Cissé | My uncle who already lived in Paris since the 60’s, was in charge of my welfare. Naturally he arranged for me to join him.

JBC | You’ve previously been involved in a string of jobs as varied as: tailor, construction worker,  apprentice in a wallpaper manufacturing company, but also as a baker for nearly 18 years. Lately you’ve been earning a living as a security guard. How has this seemingly chaotic career evolution influenced your ethos as an artist?

MC | It is not so much the jobs that I’ve had to assume but rather living in large cities and later traveling which has greatly influenced my vision as an artist. However, my last position as a security guard marked a big turning point, because as I was working at night. I drew so that I would not fall asleep.

JBC | Your art seems to celebrate if not sublimate the incredible power of human endeavour; the almost fearless desire of men to expand and conquer uncharted territories. Where does this fascination comes from?

MC | I’ve always been fascinated by human ingenuity and our ability to devise solutions to the problems posed by our own development. Strangely, this makes me very optimistic for the future.

JBC | African artists in general, even those emulating from the diaspora, are still too often stereotyped in such derogatory terms such as so called “primitive artists” or “naïve artists”; although it is clear the vast majority of contemporary African artists do not fit into these limiting categories. Do you think an artist – African or not – should be evaluated based only on his geographic origin or better yet based on his cultural background?

MC | Creativity has no origin and knows no boundaries. To me categories are mere simplifications.

JBC | How would you describe your own work and to what artistic current do you feel closest to?

MC | My only source of inspiration is the city itself and more so the architectural urban landscape. I am neither an architect nor an urbanist, but I do feel close to them. I do not necessarily feel close to any artistic movement.

JBC | There is an obsessive attention to detail pervading throughout your body of work. It is difficult to imagine that some of your drawings are actually achieved freehand. What technic do you use?… and approximately how much time is required to complete a piece?

MC | First I build a grid by defining the perspectives, then I start playing on the heights and depths. The grid is executed freehand with a pencil, then I fix it with an ink pen before applying colour with various types of markers. I need approximately ten days to execute a design in a size of 24 x 32 cm.

JBC | Apart from “urbanism”, “futurism” seems to be an other predominant theme of inspiration.

MC | Through my drawings, I’m inventing a future that will be able to house and feed our ever so increasingly expanding world population. I believe it is the core responsibility of a city to do so; to host, to feed and bring together its community. At least, that’s the kind of city I aspire to reinvent.

JBC | What is your take on the evolution of African cities and do you think they should follow the blueprint of western megapolis?

MC | Megacities already exist in Africa. The main issue resides in the fact that African cities are growing very rapidly and tend to spread too fast. We must learn to build upwards in order to preserve the land. We must learn to manage space.

JBC | What is your position regarding ecology and do you think there is a real chance for modern day society to wise up and incorporate greener solutions in order to reduce pollution; for example regarding the emissions of carbon monoxide?

MC | The technologies that help us reduce pollution already exist and a lot is already done to put them into practice. As far as urbanism, making ecology part of the equation will give us the ability to build better, safer… and greener. It is just as much the responsibility of scientists and creatives-thinkers to articulate these modules, as it is for politicians to implement them effectively, and for us citizen of humanity to fulfil our duty by putting them into pratice on a daily basis.

JBC | Many of your drawings strangely resemble the beautiful, intricate and colourful tibetan mandalas. Is there an element of spirituality hidden inside your work ?

MC | I believe that every work of art holds a kind of spiritual dimension. My work glorifies human endeavour and the cities that I reinvent are places of joy.

 

 

 

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Ayahuasca Visions: Concentración Palistica by Pablo Amaringo


Concentración Palistica by Pablo Amaringo

Concentracion Palistica by Pablo AmaringoAyahuasqueros gain their knowledge from visions whereas paleros, who diet with the roots, barks and branches of certain trees, obtain their knowledge through dreams.

The two trees you see in upper part of the painting guard the door through which he enters to learn. On the left is the remocaspi tree,and on the right is the huairacaspi. Between these trees, you can see the temple of alquimia palistica, which is made from a variety of trees and is very beautiful, it is possible to go there in an ayahuasca vision and still be received.

This painting  is featured in the book ‘The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo‘  published by Inner Traditions 2011. Authors Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley.

Click to visit the website of the book for articles and interviews with Pablo Amaringo, also photo galleries and see the paintings with summary narratives.

To purchase high quality fine art reproductions and Greeting Cards of the paintings click to visit our store

25% Promotional Discount until December 31st 2012. Promotion Code: JXXUEV

ABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO

Concentracion Palistica by Pablo AmaringoIllustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.

With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

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Ayahuasca Inspired Art: Howard G Charing


Ayahuasca ArtAyahuasca Inspired Art: Howard G Charing

November 2012, Acrylic on Canvas, 90cm x 70cm

 

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Trueno Ayahuasca by Pablo Amaringo


Trueno AyahuascaTrueno Ayahuasca (Thunder Ayahuasca) by Pablo Amaringo

This is a variety of ayahuasca liana which can be seen growing from two Shipibo pots and forms two pillars which support a splendid palace of learning. People who learn here open their arms and says ‘blessed ayahuasca you are my teacher’, and that is what you are here for. Drinking Trueno Ayahuasca with a knowledgeable shaman can be an overwhelming experience causing thunder and torrential rain to fall, but it integrates you strongly with the biological cycle of the Amazon.

This painting  is featured in the book ‘The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo‘  published by Inner Traditions 2011. Authors Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley.

Click to visit the website of the book for articles and interviews with Pablo Amaringo, also photo galleries and see the paintings with summary narratives.

To purchase high quality fine art reproductions and Greeting Cards of the paintings click to visit our store

25% Promotional Discount until December 31st 2012. Promotion Code: JXXUEV
Trueno AyahuascaABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO
Illustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

 

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Yana Huáman (Aguila Negra) by Pablo Amaringo


Yana Huáman by Pablo Amaringo

Yana Huáman – Aguila Negra

Yana huáman means ‘black eagle’ in Quechua, and refers to a powerful maestro. The black eagle has phenomenal eyesight and can distinguish small details from a great distance, thus a yana huáman possesses the gifts of insight and discernment.The woman on the right edge of the picture is the Mother of the puca lupuna. A deserving maestro climbs the stairway (bottom right) to her temple. She is the ‘tree of the red moon’ and teaches the mysteries of the lunar rhythm that influences women’s ovulation

This painting  is featured in the book ‘The Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo‘  published by Inner Traditions 2011. Authors Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley.

Click to visit the website of the book for articles and interviews with Pablo Amaringo, also photo galleries and see the paintings with summary narratives.

To purchase high quality fine art reproductions and Greeting Cards of the paintings click to visit our store

25% Promotional Discount until December 31st 2012. Promotion Code: JXXUEV

ABOUT: THE AYAHUASCA VISIONS OF PABLO AMARINGO

Illustrating the evolution of his intricate and colorful art, this book contains 48 full-color reproductions of Amaringo’s latest works with detailed explorations of the rich Amazonian mythology underlying each painting. Through their longstanding relationship with Amaringo, coauthors Charing and Cloudsley are able to share the personal stories behind his visions and experiences with Amazonian people and folklore, capturing Amaringo’s powerful ecological and spiritual message through his art and words.

With contributions by Graham Hancock, Jeremy Narby, Robert Venosa, Dennis McKenna, Stephan Beyer, and Jan Kounen, this book brings the ayahuasca experience to life as we travel on Amaringo’s visionary brush and palette.

 

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