Tag Archives: artists

Vanishing Points: An exhibition at the Harn Museum of Art


Jimmy Donegan - PapaTjukurpa 2008. 180 x 200cm Acrylic on canvas

The Harn Museum of Art presents “Vanishing Points: Paintings from the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection”, on view at the museum through April 29th. The exhibition showcases contemporary artists who push and explore the boundaries of painting. Twenty-seven international artists defy the limits of painting by applying it to large-scale canvases, sculptures and found objects. These works combine to create a rich and exciting visual experience. The collectors, Debra and Dennis Scholl, have been collecting contemporary art for 33 years. They loaned the works for this exhibition, which represents established and emerging artists who work across the boundaries of specific media, providing proactive and new perspectives on art and culture.

“Vanishing Points also reflects a world transformed by contemporary science, technology and media,” said Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Curator of Contemporary Art. “Artists expand on historical notions of perspective and spatial orientation opening up multiple and interesting ways of viewing the world.” Artists in the exhibition incorporate the strategies of technology and media in the texture of their work including urban architecture, graphic and automotive design, comics, mapping, sculpture, photography and film. Vanishing Points is a collaboration between the Scholls, the Bass Museum of Art in Miami and the Harn Museum of Art and was co-curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith from the Harn Museum of Art and Gean Moreno from the Bass Museum of Art. The exhibition is made possible by the Sidney Knight Endowment and the Exhibition Circle. The exhibition catalogue is available in the Museum Store.

The exhibition includes the work of the Aboriginal visionary artist Jimmy Donegan.

Jimmy was born near Ngatuntjarra Bore. He grew up in country around Blackstone and Mantamaru. Jimmy has family links throughout the Pitjantjarra lands; his wife is from near Kulka. Jimmy brought his wife and children to live at Blackstone because of Jimmy’s tie to country here. He is widowed and has four children. Jimmy is a wonderful wood craftsman, his spears, spear throwers and boomerangs are prized and much sought after. He is rich in story and a strong man for law and culture.

Papa Tjukurpa Pukara

Ngayu mamaku ngura Dulu (my father’s country rockhole is called Dulu). At this place there are lots of Dingoes living there, digging up the water and hunting at Pilantjara rockhole in the country area of Dulu. This is Papa Walka, Dog design. Pukara is [my] grandfather’s country. It is a story about a sacred men’s site in Western Australia, south of Wingellina. It is a Watersnake Dreaming story. This is where the Watersnake fell down and his elbow makes an indent in the landscape. This is the creation story for the Honey Grevillea. Birds are really scared of this water at Pukara. It is like a “big boss”, this water.

Jimmy Donegan

Jimmy Donegan - Pukara

Jimmy Donegan - Papa Mora

Jimmy Donegan - Papa Tjukurpa Pukara

by Jimmy Donegan

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Pablo Amaringo – at home in Pucallpa – Video Clip


A clip of the great visionary artist Pablo Amaringo at his home in Pucallpa (Peru). Pablo is showing Howard some of his work, including some large mural paintings.

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Pablo Amaringo’s Foreword to the book Plant Spirit Shamanism


Pablo Amaringo with Howard G Charing presenting the book ‘Plant Spirit Shamanism’Pablo Amaringo is one of the world’s greatest visionary artists, and is renowned for his highly complex, colourful and intricate paintings of his visions from drinking the Ayahuasca brew. Pablo is a true visionary, and wrote this inspirational foreword to the book Plant Spirit Shamanism (Destiny Books USA).

My visions helped me understand the value of human beings, animals, the plants themselves, and many other things. The plants taught me the function they play in life, and the holistic meaning of all life. We all should give special attention and deference to Mother Nature. She deserves our love. And we should also show a healthy respect for her power!

Plants are essential in many ways: they give life to all beings on Earth by producing oxygen, which we need to be active; they create the enormous greenhouse that gives board and lodging to diverse but interrelated guests; they are teachers who show us the holistic importance of conserving life in its due form and necessary conditions.

For me personally, though, they mean even more than this. Plants—in the great living book of nature—have shown me how to study life as an artist and shaman. They can help all of us to know the art of healing and to discover our own creativity, because the beauty of nature moves people to show reverence, fascination, and respect for the extent to which the forests give shelter to our souls.

The consciousness of plants is a constant source of information for medicine, alimentation, and art, and an example of the intelligence and creative imagination of nature. Much of my education I owe to the intelligence of these great teachers. Thus I consider myself to be the “representative” of plants, and for this reason I assert that if they cut down the trees and burn what’s left of the rainforests, it is the same as burning a whole library of books without ever having read them.

People who are not so dedicated to the study and experience of plants may not think this knowledge is so important to their lives—but even they should be conscious of the nutritional, medicinal, and scientific value of the plants they rely on for life.

My most sublime desire, though, is that every human being should begin to put as much attention as he or she can into the knowledge of plants, because they are the greatest healers of all. And all human beings should also put effort into the preservation and conservation of the rainforest, and care for it and the ecosystem, because damage to these not only prejudices the flora and fauna but humanity itself.

Even in the Amazon these days, many see plants as only a resource for building houses and to finance large families. People who have farms and raise animals also clear the forest to produce foodstuffs. Mestizos and native Indians log the largest trees to sell to industrial sawmills for subsistence. They have never heard of the word ecology!

I, Pablo, say to everybody who lives in the Amazon and the other forests of the world, that they must love the plants of their land, and everything that is there!

This expression of love must be a sincere and altruistic interest in the lasting well-being of others. We are not here simply to exist, but to enjoy life together with plants, animals, and loved ones, and to delight in contemplation of the beauty of nature. A shaman has in his mind and heart the attitude of conserving nature because he knows that life is for enjoying the company of this world’s countless delights.

Any painting, or book, or piece of art that spreads this message is to be respected, and every reader who picks up a book on this subject is to be honored.

I invite you to read on, and to learn from the greatest teachers of all—the plants, our sacred brothers and sisters.

Pablo Amaringo

Photo: Pablo Amaringo with Howard G Charing presenting the book. Pucallpa, Peru 2007.

Click to view the interview with Pablo Amaringo by Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley first published in Sacred Hoop Magazine

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