Tag Archives: ayahuasca retreats

PlantTeachers – Retreat to the Amazon – November 21st – 30th


 

Come to Peru!

 

~In the Spirit & Practice of Amazonian Shamanism~   November 21 – 30, 2011

 
Nine Nights of Healing ~ Ten Days of Transformation

 

Opportunity for Five Ayahuasca Ceremonies, Customized Plant Diet, Work with Shipibo Shaman Ricardo Amaringo, Conscious Path Creation with Sita

 

 

I am pleased and honored to invite you to join me as I guide a small group of seekers in the Peruvian Amazon for retreat and dieta.

We will work in the traditional ways of the Shipibo, dieting and participating in ritual ceremonies in the beautiful jungle outside of Iquitos, Peru.

You will be able to participate in up to five ceremonies and to travel with us on an optional extension trip to the Pacaya Samiria Reserve, in the deep primary forest for an additional ceremony. Together we will explore our outer and inner worlds, challenge our consciousness, share our individual and collective experience, engage in spirited dialogues, listen to lectures, traditional indigenous chants “icaros,” experience transformational process with the Conscious Path and ayahuasca ceremonies in the sensuous, vibrating rainforest of Amazonian Peru.

We will be working with Master Curandero Ricardo Amaringo, Maestra Curandera Olivia Arevalo, Dr. Joe Tafur and Sitaramaya.  Activities include, Ayahuasca experiences, mind, body, heart and soul healing, dieta, art, relaxation, use and sharing of knowledge in medical plants, private Conscious Path consultations, private consultations with the Shamans and a local excursions.

Retreat to the Amazon will be an experience where we will create a community for ten days. Not only will we practice the dieta and explore the teachings, use and practices of Ayahuasca and Master Teacher Plants, but we will learn more about non-ordinary states, shamanic practices from around the world and deep ecology. During our time together, we will live together at the retreat center.

Retreat to the Amazon is designed for healing, repose, diet, reflection and inspiration. We seek to teach, inspire, facilitate healing, foster awareness of expanded consciousness and deep ecology, develop new friendships and connect with old friends. For those interested, we will continue on to the Pacaya Samiria Reserve for three more days where we will participate in one more Ayahuasca Ceremony, deep in the primary forest.

I hope to see you there.

– Sita

In gratitude for the opportunity to steward the sharing of this sacred plant medicine,

~more peace, more joy, more love~



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Shipibo Traditional Painting – Video


Teresa painting in traditional styleShipibo craftswoman Teresa, showing traditional painting. In this video Teresa starts with a blank piece of cotton and within an hour and a half completes a fascinating example of the traditional art of the Shipibo people of the Upper Amazon in Peru.

Click for a detailed article on the world of the Shipibo;

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Ayahuasca Shipibo Shaman – Medicinal Plants of the Amazon Part 4


Used by Shipibo shamans for ceremonial workAyahuasca Shipibo Shaman, Enrique Lopez talks with our group about Amazonian shamanism, medicinal, and the spiritual properties of plants. Video taken at Eagle’s Wing Ayahuasca Retreatat Mishana in Peru, March 2008.

Visit our website for info on our Ayahuasca and Yoga Retreats in Peru

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Ayahuasca Shipibo Shaman – Medicinal Plants of the Amazon Part 3


Shipibo Shaman with Ajo Sacha plant Ayahuasca Shipibo Shaman, Enrique Lopez talks with our group about Amazonian shamanism, medicinal, and the spiritual properties of plants. Video taken at Eagle’s Wing Ayahuasca Retreat at Mishana in Peru, March 2008.

Visit our website for info on our Ayahuasca and Yoga Retreats in Peru

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Ayahuasca Shipibo Shaman – Medicinal Plants of the Amazon Part 1


Ayahuasca Shipibo Shaman, Enrique Lopez talks with our group about Amazonian shamanism, medicinal, and the spiritual properties of plants. Video taken at Eagle’s Wing Ayahuasca Retreat at Mishana in Peru, March 2008

Click for details about our Ayahuasca and Yoga Retreats in Peru

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Ayahuasca Retreat – Shipibo Shaman Video


Shipibo Shaman Enrique Lopez blesses and invokes Ayahuasca after brewing. Video taken at Eagle’s Wing Ayahuasca Retreat March 2008.

 Visit our website for info on our Ayahuasca Retreats

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Shipibo Ayahuasca Shaman Leoncio Garcia


Shipibo Ayahuasca Shaman Leoncio GarciaThe Shipibo are one of the largest ethnic groups in the Peruvian Amazon. These ethnic groups each have their own languages, traditions and culture. The Shipibo which currently number about 20,000 are spread out in communities through the Pucallpa / Ucayali river region. They are highly regarded in the Amazon as being masters of Ayahuasca, and many aspiring shamans and Ayahuasqueros from the region study with the Shipibo to learn their language, chants, and plant medicine knowledge.

Interviewed at Mishana Private Retreat Centre, Amazon Rainforest with Peter Cloudsley and Howard G Charing August 2005.

We interviewed Shipibo maestro Leoncio Garcia, a man in his mid seventies but with the appearance of a man twenty years younger. Again a testimonial to the youth giving qualities of Ayahuasca and the plant medicines of the Amazon Rainforest.

Shipibo Ayahuasca Shaman Leoncio GarciaLeoncio Garcia
I didn’t become a shaman until I was 50, I am now 74. I was always so busy working in the chacra, or cutting wood, it was only when I began to get a bit older. Until then I had taken Ayahuasca for all the usual reasons of health, but that was all. After deciding to do the diet I drank Ayahuasca seriously but I didn’t see anything and didn’t think I would learn anything but still I kept on drinking every night and didn’t sleep. With just one day to go before completing three months’ diet, I had a tremendous vision and I began to chant and continued all night until dawn. I saw under the earth, under the water, and into the skies, everything. Probably I was learning from the sprits during the diet but I didn’t understand. After that I could see what the matter was with people. I dieted pinon Colorado and tobacco first and then tried all the other plants.

This was in San Francisco, a Shipibo community on Yarinacocha, Pucullpa where I was born. After this I went to Huancayo for six months to try my medicine. Then I went to Ayacucho and then a Senor took me to Lima to heal his wife. After two months I was taken to Trujillo and then Arequipa, Cusco, Juliaca, Puno. Everything worked out well and I worked with a doctor once who was not very successful and soon there were people queuing outside her consultancy. Eventually I came to Iquitos in 2000 and I haven’t had time to return to my family since then, I just send them money.

When I go round to people blowing tobacco smoke it is to give them arcanas, to protect them so that when things happen around them it doesn’t hurt them or make them ill.

Leoncio tells a Shipibo (cautionary) myth.
There was once a wise man called Oni who knew what each and every healing plant could be used for. He knew all their names and one day he saw a liana and recognized it as Ayahuasca and he learned to mix it with Chacruna. One night he tried it and learned so many things that he carried on drinking it. But because he went on drinking so long and often he stopped eating and drinking, and just chanted day and night. Now he had two sons and they said ‘come and have breakfast Papa’, but he carried on drinking Ayahuasca and when they tried to pick him up, he was stuck to the ground and couldn’t be moved. So they left him chanting to all the plants everyday and night and they noticed that Ayahuasca was growing out from his fingers. So the sons went back to their chacras and after a month came back again, to see their father. Everywhere Ayahuasca ropes had tangled around him and still he continued chanting day after day and the forest carried on growing around him. After a few more months, he had merged with the forest itself and that is why its called Ayahuasca, rope of the dead and in Shipibo Oni.

Click to visit our website for details on our Ayahuasca Yoga Retreats in the Amazon

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Shipibo Ayahuasca Shaman – Benjamin Ochavano


Shipibo Ayahuasca Shaman -  Benjamin OchavanoConversation with Benjamín Ochavano, Peru 2002

Howard G Charing & Peter Cloudsley interviewed Shipibo Ayahuasca Shaman Benjamin Ochavano in the Amazon Rainforest of Peru, who is in his mid seventies to discuss how Ayahuasca can help those Westerners who are seeking personal growth and who have embarked on the great journey of self discovery and exploration.

The uses of powerful hallucinogenic plants such as Ayahuasca have been developed by indigenous peoples and early civilizations over thousands of years, and their effects are highly dependent upon the context of the ceremony, the chants and the essential personality of the shaman, all of which can vary with surprising results.

Diverse urban uses have emerged recently and a few of these are spreading, while some traditional shamans travel the world, thus Ayahuasca is gaining recognition in Western civilization. But what really is the potential of these ancestral plants, and how can we get the most out of them?
I first started taking ayahuasca at the age of 10, with my father, who was also a shaman. When I was 15, he took me into the selva to do plant diets, nobody would see us for a whole year, we had no contact with women, nothing. We lived in a simple tambo sleeping on leaves with just a sheet over us. We dieted plants: ayauma, puchatekicaspi, pucarobona, huairacaspi, verenaquu.

I would take each plant for 2 months before moving on to the next, a whole year without women! The only fish allowed is boquichico – a vegetarian fish and mushed plantains made into a thick drink called pururuco in Shipibo, or chapo without sugar.

Then I had about a year’s rest before going again with my uncle, Jose Sánchez, for another year and 7 months of dieting on the little Rio Pisqui. He taught me alot and gave me chonta, cascabel, hergon, nacanaca, cayucayu. He was a chontero, a kind of shaman who works with darts (in the spiritual world) – so called because real darts and arrows for hunting are made from the black splintery bamboo called chonta. A chontero can send darts with positive effects like knowledge and power too, and he knows how to suck and remove poisoned darts which have caused illness or evil spells.

To finish off he gave me chullachaqui caspi. Then I began living with my wife and working as a curandero in Juancito on the Ucayali. Later I went to Pucallpa where I still live some of the time when I’m not in my community of Paoyhan, where my Ani Sheati project is.

The most important planta maestra is Ayauma chullachaqui. Then Pucalo puno (Quechua) the bark of a tree which grows to 40 or 50 meters. This is one of a number of plants that is consumed together with tobacco and is so strong, you only need to take it two times. It requires a diet of 6 month. You drink it in the morning, then lie down, you are in an altered state for a whole day afterwards.

Another plant is Catahua whose resin is cooked with tabacco. You must be sure that no one sees you while you take it. It puts you into a sleep of powerful dreams.

Ajosquiro is from a tree which grows to 20m, with a penetrating aroma like garlic. It gives you mental strength, it is very healing and makes you strong. It takes away lazy feelings, gives you courage and self esteem, but can be used to explore the negative side as well as the positive. You can be alone in the wilderness yet feel in the company of many. It puts you into the psycho-magical world which we have inherited from our ancestors, the great morayos (=shamans in Shipibo) so you can gain knowledge of how to heal with plants.

The word ‘shaman’ is recent in the Amazon, (coming from Asia via the Western world in the last 10-20 years). My father was known as a moraya or banco, or in Spanish curandero. A curandero could specialize in being a good chontero or a shitanero who does harm to people.

Virjilio Salvan, who is dead now, dead now introduced me to a plant which he said was better than any other plant – Palo Borrador, maestro de todos los palos (master of all plants). You smoke it in a pipe for 8 days, blowing the smoke over your body. On the eighth day a man appears, as real as we are, a Shipibo. He was a chaycuni – an enchanted being in traditional dress… cushma, or woven tunic, chaquira necklace, and so on, and he said to me ‘Benjamin, why have you smoked my tree?’
‘Because I want to learn’ I said. ‘Ever since I was little I wanted to be a Moraya’

‘You must diet and smoke my tree for 3 months, no more’ he said. ‘And you can eat whatever fish you like…it won’t matter’ … and he listed all the fish I could eat. ‘But you must not sleep with any woman other than your wife’ he said. And I’ve followed this advice until today.

Three nights later, sounds could be heard from under the ground and big holes opened up and the wind blew. Then everyone, all the family began to fly. And from that day I was a moraya.
Today I still fast on Sundays .

What do you think about Westerners coming to take plants in the Amazon?

It is a good thing for them to come and learn, for us to share and for there to be an interchange. This is what I would like to do in my community of Paoyhan. But the Ecuadorians stole our outboard motor.

How could the plants of the Amazon help people of the West?

It can open up the mind so we can find ways to help each other. It can help them find more self-realization in life. If a person is very shy for example it can help warm their hearts, give them strength and courage.

You have a different system in your countries, when we travel there we feel underrated just as when you come here you have to get accustomed to being here. When we get to know each other and become like brothers, solutions emerge. To get rid of vices and drug addictions, for example, there are plants which can easily heal people.

Pene de mono is a thick tree, which I have used to cure two foreign women of AIDS. The name means ‘monkey’s penis’. I saw in my ayahuasca vision that they were ill and diagnosed them as having AIDS. I boiled the bark of the tree and made 6 bottles which they took each day until it was finished. They had to go on a diet as well. No fish with teeth, salt, fruit or butter. The fish with teeth eat the plant so it cannot penetrate into the body. After this you get so hot that steam comes off the body. In the selva there is no AIDS, only some cases in the city of Pucullpa.

visit our website for info on our Andean San Pedro and Amazon Ayahuasca Yoga Retreats

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Iquitos – Gateway to the Amazon


Iquitos - Gateway to the AmazonIquitos is the largest city in the Peruvian rainforest, with a population of around 400,000. It is the capital of Loreto Region and Maynas Province. It is generally considered the most populous city in the world that cannot be reached by road (except to Nauta 120 Km on the Rio Marañón).

The only way to get there is via aeroplane or by river boat. The city in the 19th century was the centre of the Rubber industry but by the early 20th century the rubber trade had moved to the Far East, and the city had fallen into neglect and disrepair. It is now a place without an apparent purpose resplendent in its post-colonial-rubber-boom splendour, literally in the middle of nowhere, a true frontier town.

When you stand on the Malecon at the edge of the city (and civilisation) …….you overlook thousands of miles of rainforest, a truly breathtakingly beautiful experience.This is a video clip of imagery of Iquitos. Including Belen market, Puerto Bellevista. Iquitos is the base where we leave for our Ayahuasca Retreats at Mishana.

Click for details about our Amazon Ayahuasca Retreats

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